On My Shelf Interview

Matt Smethurst, the managing editor of the Gospel Coalition, recently had a brief interview with me about my life and books. You can read it here.

Posted in Christian Experience, Guest Post, My Reading, What I'm Reading | Leave a comment

Podcast: On Biblical Exegesis and Systematic Theology

Mere FidelityIn this week’s episode of Mere Fidelity, Derek, Matt, and I discuss the often troubled relationship between biblical exegesis and systematic theology. More exciting still, we now have intro music, courtesy of Kenneth Padgett of The Joy Eternal!

You can also follow the podcast on iTunes, or using this RSS feed. Listen to past episodes on Soundcloud and on this page on my blog.

*If you would like to support the production of the Mere Fidelity podcast, helping us to cover our monthly costs, please visit our Patreon page*

Posted in Bible, Controversies, Hermeneutics, NT Theology, OT Theology, Podcasts, Scripture, Theological | 1 Comment

Men, Women, and the Nature of Christian Teaching: Two Responses to Aimee Byrd

Yesterday, Aimee Byrd kindly responded to my post about a natural complementarian theology. The Calvinist International have just published my response to Byrd’s response, along with some thoughts from Dr. Eric Hutchinson:

In a fallen world, where the differences between the sexes have often been the occasion of abuse, oppression, and denigration, it is not without cause that we should want to avoid or suppress this reality and only approach the subject with the greatest trepidation, especially in mixed company.

However, as Christians I believe that we would be mistaken to do so. Far from downplaying this reality, maleness and femaleness are tightly woven into the deep structure of the biblical narrative and symbolic world, because they are so woven in the world God created. They are differences to be celebrated and rejoiced in, aspects of the life-giving playfulness of God’s world. Throughout Scripture, each sex is prominently displayed in those very respects in which it most stands out from the other. These differences are not so much differences from each other as they are differences for each other. Nor are these differences that constrain us; rather, they empower us. As we discover ourselves as man and woman and thus discover the wonder of our differences in relation, something of the richer life of the creation is revealed to us. They are differences that are best expressed, not in the dense and heavily qualified prose of gender theory, but in the surprise and joy of song. In them we experience something of the meaning of creation as the realm of God’s delight, a delight that brings all else into appropriate perspective.

Read the whole thing here.

Posted in Christian Experience, Controversies, Creation, Culture, Ethics, Guest Post, Sex and Sexuality, Society, Theological | 4 Comments

13 Today!

Today is the 13th anniversary of my first blog post. Not a lot takes place here nowadays, beyond links to posts elsewhere, but it still feels good to reach the landmark.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Podcast: The Righteous Mind

Mere FidelityIn this week’s episode of Mere Fidelity, Derek, Andrew, and I get together to discuss Jonathan Haidt’s moral foundations thesis, as laid out in his book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion.

You can also follow the podcast on iTunes, or using this RSS feed. Listen to past episodes on Soundcloud and on this page on my blog.

*If you would like to support the production of the Mere Fidelity podcast, helping us to cover our monthly costs, please visit our Patreon page*

Posted in Controversies, Ethics, Podcasts, Politics, Sex and Sexuality, Society, Theological | 3 Comments

Natural Complementarians: Men, Women, and the Way Things Are

In a post over on The Calvinist International, I interact with Aimee Byrd’s recent First Things article, ‘The Taming of the Beau‘ and argue against the ideological turn in some quarters of contemporary complementarian thought. Biblical teaching regarding men and women is primarily descriptive of the natural differences between the sexes: its vision for relations between the sexes always remains firmly grounded in the way that things are.

[T]he focus in the biblical teaching on sex is less upon gender roles and rules than it is upon the fact that men and women are created differently, for different purposes, with different strengths, and with different natural orientations. The teaching is principally descriptive, rather than prescriptive: men and women have different callings because they were created as different ‘genres’ of human being. For instance, the fact that, across ages and human cultures and down to the present day, men have dominated in the exercise of direct social power is not a result of ideology or even of sin, even though in our world it is invariably adumbrated and attended by both respectively. In speaking of man as the ‘head’, Scripture isn’t primarily saying that the man should be the head: it is saying that the man is the head. Although such statements are not merely descriptive, we should never miss the descriptive force that lies at their heart.

Read the whole thing here.

Posted in Bible, Controversies, Creation, Culture, Ethics, Genesis, Guest Post, Sex and Sexuality, Society, Theological | 16 Comments

The Theopolis Institute has a New Podcast

The good folks at the Theopolis Institute have started a new podcast. I am sure that anyone who likes the work of James Jordan and Peter Leithart will find much to appreciate.

Posted in Podcasts, Theological | 1 Comment